It’s All About The Fascia!

If you are physically hurt, if your body isn’t moving, if you are in pain, you need to know at least a bit about fascia so that you can get the right kind of work done with the least amount of invasive procedures and pain killers.

Fascia is a thin casing of connective tissue that surrounds and holds every organ, blood vessel, bone, nerve fiber and muscle in place. The tissue does more than provide internal structure; fascia has nerves that make it almost as sensitive as skin. When stressed, it tightens up.

Let me repeat that so that you understand the importance of fascia regarding the functioning of the body. It is NOT the bones that hold the body and its structures in place and functioning properly. IT IS THE FASCIA. Unfortunately this is not typically understood in Western medicine. It has historically not been taught in the medical arena. Doctors and physical therapists alike have not been educated on the functioning of this all important system.

The term fascia itself translates to the word “unorganized”. This is because when it was discovered nobody knew of it’s function. It was considered unimportant. Only the bones and muscles/tendons/ligaments were considered important to the structure and function of the body. NOT TRUE.

I tell you this because if you have a body part that is injured (for example, a knee or low back issues), you need to have the fascia addressed because this is what is causing the pain, lack of mobility or compression of joints or disks. Find a physical therapist that actually hands-on addresses the fascia in the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, most times physical therapy is geared toward strengthening the muscles around the injured area. THIS MAKES NO SENSE and I will tell you why: If the connective tissue, the fascia, is restricted you are only going to restrict it more if you try to strengthen muscles before releasing the fascia (and you are likely going to do more damage).

Here’s more: by having the fascia worked properly many joint or disc surgeries can be avoided. Find a therapist that is trained in fascial work- a rolfer, a medical massage therapist, a Tom Meyer’s student (Anatomy Trains instructor and author), and some Bowen Therapists. You will be glad you did!